C-verse

naurs:

Notes and drawings by Disney animator Glen Keane

swan2swan:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:


Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.
Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.
The question you have to ask yourself is this:
What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more than the picture.


Dead bodies. As the flesh rots and the blood drains, you find a pale face with stretched and sunken skin, stretching it across the cheekbones and jaws, eventually leaving skulls with empty sockets…it’s the fear of death.

swan2swan:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:

Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.

Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.

The question you have to ask yourself is this:

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more than the picture.

Dead bodies. As the flesh rots and the blood drains, you find a pale face with stretched and sunken skin, stretching it across the cheekbones and jaws, eventually leaving skulls with empty sockets…it’s the fear of death.

ladymargo:

Dear Tumblr,
I just got around to seeing this movie, despite the fact that it did not get a wide-release.
Find it and watch it.
Believe me when I say, this film is in the same league of sci-fi/speculative film classics as Bladerunner and Children of Men.
This.
Movie.
Should have a HUGE fandom.
It deals with issues like class, caste-systems, oppression, and the nature of humanity in a way mainstream films like The Hunger Games never could.
Let me tell you a story about the film-maker Joon-Ho Bong. Some years back, I had the privilege of attending a screening of one his films and the man happened to be there. At that time, he’d already gotten some notice for making The Host, another awesome film that allegorizes heavy issues in humanity.
So, he does the q&a at the end and someone asks him why he’s never produced a Hollywood movie.
…And he says, paraphrasing; that Hollywood would never let him make the kind of movies he’d like.  He’d have to hire an all-white cast and the actors would have to fit a certain aesthetic. They couldn’t be non-white, older than twenty-five, or non-thin…especially actresses.
He said, it’s not worth selling out, when he can make the kinds of movies he wants in South Korea.
…And then he makes this.
I’d love to spoil it for you, but suffice it say it was, as all good speculative sci-fi is, very effecting for me.
Again, I beg you PLEASE SEE THIS MOVIE.
And if you need more convincing??
Your faves are in it:  Octavia Spencer aka the above flawless actress in the poster, Chris Evans, Tilda Swinton, Jamie Bell, John Hurt, Ed Harris and the father/daughter pair from The Host, Kang-So Hung and Ah-Sung Ko (which had me thinking AU!).
Now, I shall commence spamming my tumblr with Snowpiercer reblogs…
Apologies ahead of time.
EDIT:  ONE MORE THING!! A critic asked who his current favorite actor is and his answer was Viola Davis…
This was YEARS before The Help.

ladymargo:

Dear Tumblr,

I just got around to seeing this movie, despite the fact that it did not get a wide-release.

Find it and watch it.

Believe me when I say, this film is in the same league of sci-fi/speculative film classics as Bladerunner and Children of Men.

This.

Movie.

Should have a HUGE fandom.

It deals with issues like class, caste-systems, oppression, and the nature of humanity in a way mainstream films like The Hunger Games never could.

Let me tell you a story about the film-maker Joon-Ho Bong. Some years back, I had the privilege of attending a screening of one his films and the man happened to be there. At that time, he’d already gotten some notice for making The Host, another awesome film that allegorizes heavy issues in humanity.

So, he does the q&a at the end and someone asks him why he’s never produced a Hollywood movie.

…And he says, paraphrasing; that Hollywood would never let him make the kind of movies he’d like.  He’d have to hire an all-white cast and the actors would have to fit a certain aesthetic. They couldn’t be non-white, older than twenty-five, or non-thin…especially actresses.

He said, it’s not worth selling out, when he can make the kinds of movies he wants in South Korea.

…And then he makes this.

I’d love to spoil it for you, but suffice it say it was, as all good speculative sci-fi is, very effecting for me.

Again, I beg you PLEASE SEE THIS MOVIE.

And if you need more convincing??

Your faves are in it:  Octavia Spencer aka the above flawless actress in the poster, Chris Evans, Tilda Swinton, Jamie Bell, John Hurt, Ed Harris and the father/daughter pair from The Host, Kang-So Hung and Ah-Sung Ko (which had me thinking AU!).

Now, I shall commence spamming my tumblr with Snowpiercer reblogs…

Apologies ahead of time.

EDIT:  ONE MORE THING!! A critic asked who his current favorite actor is and his answer was Viola Davis…

This was YEARS before The Help.

lacedskies:

Metropolis (2001)

Do you have any advice and/or links for writing a character with manic depression?
Anonymous

writingweasels:

First, remember to treat mental illnesses with respect. Mental illnesses are really misunderstood and stigmatized. I’ll get you a few links as a starting point, but I suggest doing a lot more research. Also, no one experiences mental illness the exact same way. People have different symptoms, different treatment. Manic depression is now called bipolar disorder. The world of psychology is constantly changing. Bipolar disorder is especially misunderstood and is often conflated with violence. People who have a mental illness are more likely to be victims of violence than the perpetrators of violence. 

What is Bipolar Disorder?

WriteWorld: Mental Disorders

Mental Illness: Your Character is not Their Disorder

Publishing: What Agents Do and Why They Are Necessary

writing-questions-answered:

Are you trying to save my soul?


The Hungarian flag with the remains of a felled statue of Stalin; the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

The Hungarian flag with the remains of a felled statue of Stalin; the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

Guide: Medieval Monarchy

clevergirlhelps:

writing-questions-answered:

Pretty solid, but some corrections need to be made:

  • Medieval kings had absolute power over their kingdoms in practice only. There were exceptions like Charlemagne and Albert the Great that somehow managed to exert centralizing power over their nations, but for the most part, the king was the nobles’ bitch until he started collecting taxes directly from the burgher/city-dwelling class.
  • Medieval kings generally did the most battlefield leading before the 1100s. They were expected to direct troops and provide a strategy, but they weren’t screaming into battle headfirst unless you were a diehard like Richard the Lionheart (who incidentally died in battle). Also, most battles in the Middle Ages were sieges.
  • Hoo boy. The king owned all that land and all those castles mostly in practice. If he tried to take it away, he’d have a huge legal battle - or actual battle - on his hands. Kings often redistributed the lands of traitors in times of war or other times when popular opinion was still strong enough to give his words weight.
  • Palaces were crazy impractical until the invention of gunpowder (and also until the kings had a large enough treasury to build something like Versailles, which was after/during the Renaissance). 
  • Thank you for mentioning kings were patrons of the arts because they were. If they weren’t, other members of his household like his wife or children would be. Music and books were the main sources of entertainment if you could afford it. Extremely wealthy nobles like the king certainly could. And thank you for mentioning charity. There was a specific office called the almoner whose entire job was to manage charity for the poor. 
  • Yooooo no one traveled on a warhorse. Palfreys for the win! Maybe kings would switch to a destrier for the shock and awe when he entered a city, but smooth-gaited palfreys were the way to move around.
  • Finally, ay dios mio, don’t watch Braveheart as indicative of medieval society.

Listen to most of what this post says and ye shall prosper.